FABRIC OF THE COSMOS EPUB DOWNLOAD

admin Comment(0)

(Epub Download) The Fabric of the Cosmos: Space, Time, and the Texture of Reality Ebook | READ ONLINE Click button below to download or. Search. The Fabric of the Cosmos: Space, Time, and the Texture of Reality ePub The Elegant Universe ePub (Adobe DRM) download by Brian Greene. The Fabric Of The Cosmos B Greene Pdf. Version, [version]. Download, Stock, [quota]. Total Files, 1. File Size, MB. Create Date.


Author: GREGORY LEGERE
Language: English, Spanish, Arabic
Country: New Zealand
Genre: Science & Research
Pages: 615
Published (Last): 09.04.2016
ISBN: 382-3-17044-929-4
ePub File Size: 15.58 MB
PDF File Size: 10.83 MB
Distribution: Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Downloads: 38897
Uploaded by: SHERRON

Download The Fabric of the Cosmos Ebook ePub. 'A magnificent challenge to conventional ideas' Financial Times'I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It manages to . DOWNLOAD [PDF] The Fabric of the Cosmos: Space, Time, and the Texture of Reality By Brian Greene [PDF EBOOK EPUB KINDLE].. READ ONLINE The. and the Texture of Reality Brian Greene mobi download The Fabric of the Cosmos: Space, Time, and the Texture of Reality PDF - KINDLE - EPUB - MOBI The.

Download Entanglement: The Greatest Mystery in Physics book pdf audio Title: The Greatest Mystery in Physics Rating: Among them was the prophet Ezekiel. I read this in the context of quantum entanglement: More like-minded scientists are coming to the realization that we are the The Greatest Mystery in Physics epub download download Entanglement:

It all works out beautifully! Oct 29, Mark Hebwood rated it it was amazing. What an incredible journey this was. I think Brian is fantastically gifted to explain esoteric and cutting-edge cosmological concepts without the use of formulae and maths.

He says himself that he will only use metaphors to explain the ideas, but even so he remains respectful of his subject, he does not dumb things down, and I found the metaphors for the most part evocative and helpful.

Towards the end of the book, however, the ideas get so far removed from human intuition that I would have want What an incredible journey this was. Towards the end of the book, however, the ideas get so far removed from human intuition that I would have wanted a little more formalism, perhaps. But - this was on offer as well!

Brian adds a copious body of footnotes and in this way relegates a more rigorous discussion to the back of the book. This discussion will of course still not satisfy those who have an in-depth understanding of the science involved, but I don't think they are the target group of this book in the first place.

To me, this was the best account of the current state well, it's ten years old, but close enough of cosmology I have read. The field appears to be so fast-moving that some of his statements in the later chapters have already been overtaken by reality, but there is a special charm in hearing Brian suggest that the LIGO experiment may demonstrate the existence of gravitational waves in decades to come when you know that this has already happened, much sooner than he thought.

Equally, I felt a pang of regret when he expresses optimism that the LHC runs may find evidence of extra spatial dimensions soon after the upgrade to higher energies, knowing this has not happened yet, and scepticism is mounting that it ever will.

Transcending what Brian was actually teaching me about the science, I also had an epiphany when I was reading the book.

Brian talks at length about the shortcomings of the Big Bang theory, and explains how the theory of inflation may answer some of its more frustrating issues, such as the flatness problem. The flatness problem highlights the issue that a tiny difference in origin conditions would have generated a universe entirely different from the one we observe today. Now, I have always thought that this is no mystery, the fact that we are here to observe this universe is the reason we may puzzle about these finetuned conditions, but they are just one in many, equally possible, universes, and our surprise is therefore of our own making.

I even thought this position was enlightened, and quite clever. But Brian explained that physicists abhor theories that rely on unknown qualities, on axiomatic pronouncements that accept something as a given. I understood that only by asking "why" were physicists able to develop a theory that explains the finetuning, and go beyond the Big Bang as the creation theory of the universe. And this was an excellent lesson to me.

I think I knew this once, but I had forgotten about it. In my case, my anthropic stance was actually an attempt on my part to avoid a deeper question, an attempt to posit an answer where there wasn't one yet. Brian reminded me that we must never stop asking "why", that asking "why" is what makes us human. I loved this book. I can only recommend it to anybody who does not have a formal degree in science and wants to learn more about cosmology but is a bit frustrated about the lack of depth popular accounts of this topic typically provide.

Jan 26, Paul Perry rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Glancing at the reviews for Brian Greene's overview of how we view the stuff of which our universe is made, it seems that some people base their rating and opinion on how much they agree with the science, or how credible they find it. While I have read a fair few popular science books — especially in the areas of physics and cosmology, areas I find utterly fascinating and about which I am perplexed that anyone can not be astounded and beguiled — I have to assume that I am reading a fair explanat Glancing at the reviews for Brian Greene's overview of how we view the stuff of which our universe is made, it seems that some people base their rating and opinion on how much they agree with the science, or how credible they find it.

While I have read a fair few popular science books — especially in the areas of physics and cosmology, areas I find utterly fascinating and about which I am perplexed that anyone can not be astounded and beguiled — I have to assume that I am reading a fair explanation of facts and theories. That is not to say that I assume the author is more knowledgeable than me simply because he has more letters after his name, but because he grounds his claims with background and the weight of evidence that is needed for a scientific hypothesis to become a generally accepted theory.

Also, I have taken the effort to educate myself in these areas so have enough grounding myself to be able to appreciate the arguments. That said, for much of this book I'm unsure how much background would be needed to understand the explanations. Greene writes with a clarity and readability which is all too rare in any field, and is particularly welcome in discussing such big ideas.

As in Stephen Hawking's The Grand Design, Greene completely dispenses with calculations but, unlike Hawking, he also tries to keep the use of metaphor to a minimum. It cannot, of course, be dispensed with completely — metaphors are an extraordinarily powerful descriptive tool, especially in a field that can only properly be explained and understood using specialist mathematics — but for the most part Greene simply gives an overview of each field in historical context, and explains WHY it is important, what it explains and why it works.

He starts — as modern physics in so many fields must — with Isaac Newton, and particularly Newton's Bucket. If you hang a bucket of water on a rope and twist the rope, as the rope unwinds, spinning the bucket, at first the water remains stationary until the friction of the bucket's movement makes the water begin to spin. When it does, the surface becomes increasingly concave, moved outward by what why now call centripetal or centrifugal force.

But what, asked Newton, is the water moving away from, or toward? What is it moving in relation to? He decided that it moved in relation to the fixed fabric of the cosmos, the stuff in which the matter that he recognised as being the thing on which gravity works sits. Recognising that he had no way of testing this medium by experiment, Newton took this is an immutable absolute and left it at that. Greene keeps returning to the bucket and its implications throughout the book, to superb explanatory effect.

I won't go further into the details read the book! I understand a whole lot more about General Relativity and Quantum Mechanics, and why they make sense and are such powerful tools in describing our universe.

I understand that Inflationary Theory is not merely a tweak of Big Bang theory to enable it to fit observed facts, but a whole new way of looking at the growth of the universe that actually explains much more about the fundamental physics.

I'm not claiming a thorough understanding of these subjects and in some, like Brane Theory, I still found myself rather lost; a re-read may be in order , but I feel that The Fabric of the Cosmos has deepened my comprehension of and appreciation for the wonders of our universe.

Fabric Of The Cosmos Epub Download For Mac

And for the wonders of the human mind to work out these things. In around three hundred years we have developed this system, science, as a means of examining the world around us in a way which is comprehensible to anyone who is willing to put in the work. All books on science now seem to feel the need to restate this about science; it is NOT knowledge passed down from on high by men in white coats using deliberately obfuscatory language for reasons of either professional pride or conspiracy.

Science is a method that enables us to understand more and more about the world, to revel in the joy of knowing how the rainbow is formed as well as in its simple beauty.

No idea in science is sacrosanct, no theory is holy. To achieve the status of acceptance of say, General Relativity or Evolution by Natural Selection, a theory has to be tested — that is, it has to survive again and again and again the onslaught of people systematically trying to prove it wrong.

When a weakness is found the theory must be re-examined. Sometimes the fault will cause the foundations of the theory to crumble, and it will be discarded; it has still served a purpose, to show how promising such an approach is. Sometimes finding the errors will strengthen a theory and teach us more — Edwin Hubble's original calculations of distant galaxies seemed to show the universe to be about 1.

Everything else about Hubble's observation and theory made sense, there was simply an error in calculating the distance of the super novae he was using to get the figures, a correction which itself taught us much about the universe. One important way a theory is tested is to use it to make predictions in the physical world and Quantum Theory has been called far and away the most successful predictive theory in science.

It is, like every successful theory, one that accurately describes the way our universe works, with the limits of perception and understanding we have, which is why theories are modified or discarded when new information comes along. Which is why General Relativity replaced Newton's Laws of Gravitation as the best description we have for how gravity works — although NASA still use Newton's calculations most of the time, for the same reason you don't need to understand Gaussian Quadratic Maths to balance your chequebook.

Greene's book, the first I've read by him, shows why it is worth reading a range of books on the same or closely connected areas of science. While in The Grand Design, Hawking and Mlodinov managed to convey a sense of wonder and discovery on a par with Carl Sagan's writings a plaudit I don't throw around lightly! At schools, perhaps instead of training our children into narrowly defined roles, science classes should just be introducing them to the works of Greene and Hawking, Sagan and Tyson Neil deGrasse, not Mike and Krauss to show them how huge and wonderful and beautiful the universe is, and how much joy and fulfilment can be achieved through our efforts to understand it.

View 1 comment. Dec 22, J. Hushour rated it it was amazing. Being utterly unscientific I still believe toasters toast toast by invoking thrice the name of said bread and summoning forth a kind of crisping deity , I pounce on shit for the lay reader. Sacks, Sagan, Ramachandran, Richard Simmons, etc. I had never heard of Brian Greene and have typically held physics and such things at arm's length, with my other hand pinching my nose shut as if holding the world's most curious diaper: This book was recommended to me okay, it was a present by a friend who seems to be aware of my constant questioning of the nature of the very fabric of reality itself.

Luckily, this book squares a lot of things and sets them to rights for me. Greene is an awesome writer. He's funny and he describes this complicated shizz really well he likes to make Simpsons analogies. There are few parts that are mind-bending to the point where I got a headache. Greene will outright warn you to skip ahead if its getting too dense, which is nice.

As to the actual content? Fuck, it sounds like he knows what he's talking about. I'll just say, I came out of the book feeling and sounding smarter. I can rap about three-branes, the Many Worlds hypothesis and impress my friends with my knowledge of the eleven spacetime dimensions.

All-in-all, satisfying, funny, and informative. This was as very confounding book to me - not confusing but confounding. It has some amazing observations and conundrums to ponder over and I suspect I did not appreciate or even understand all that it had to tell me. Let me explain - some of the chapters used examples - some of which I have actually studied in my years in education.

For example the example where electrons can be treated as particles while at the same time be treated as waves. Now I remember the experiments and I remember the t This was as very confounding book to me - not confusing but confounding. Now I remember the experiments and I remember the theory that went with them.

But I did not associated them with the bigger picture being presented in the chapter. And so the reason why I am confounded- this book challenges many of the scientific notions, a few it takes and builds upon them often reinforcing the notions it is trying to convey.

And yet reading this book I feel there is so much more to learn and understand including some of the sections in the book itself. Ironically looking back at my education I realise that rather than trying to build a foundation for me to build upon I feel like it have been shown how little I know and how so much there is still to explore and learn.

Books like this have a variety of effects on me - but this is the first to make me feel so small in the scheme of things. But rather than making it feel a negative experience its almost like a reassurance that you are part of everything and in the right place.

As I have said earlier there is more to be learnt from this book - but for now I need let my mind rest as its had a bit of a work out reading these pages. Jul 24, DJ rated it really liked it Shelves: If mathematically challenged aliens who had somehow acquired a spacecraft landed on Earth and requested a single book to sum up our species' understanding of space, time, and physics, we would do best to give them The Fabric of the Cosmos. Pop sci books on physics have a nasty habit of either aiming too general and leaving the reader with only a fuzzy sense of awe or aiming too specific and leaving the reader with a few random facts and a general confusion over how scientists can get so excited If mathematically challenged aliens who had somehow acquired a spacecraft landed on Earth and requested a single book to sum up our species' understanding of space, time, and physics, we would do best to give them The Fabric of the Cosmos.

Pop sci books on physics have a nasty habit of either aiming too general and leaving the reader with only a fuzzy sense of awe or aiming too specific and leaving the reader with a few random facts and a general confusion over how scientists can get so excited about algebra and atoms. Greene avoids both. This is hands down the best popular intro to modern physics I've found. Even with half a B. Two unique aspects of this book I haven't found elsewhere are 1 its focus on space and time and 2 its enthusiasm.

As for 1 , most pop sci books on physics focus on trying to convey one or more specific theories quantum theory, special relativity, string theory, etc and may discuss space or time in the context of one of these theories but don't make connections between them. Greene actually makes space and time the main character of this story and follows them throughout history and across theories.

As for 2 , not since Richard Feynman have I found a physicist whose writing makes me shiver with childish delight at the wonders of the universe. Some might find his poetic geeky gushes cheesy, but others like myself will spend the next several evenings lying outside on their lawns, staring at the stars, and just basking in the awesomeness of it all. That said, don't expect a book without mathematics to convey a full picture of our current understanding of physics.

Nature seems to be written most naturally in the language of mathematics and that is the language in which she must be read. Hopefully though, if you haven't gotten over a particularly frightening encounter with mathematics as a young impressionable child, this book will convince you that it's worth doing.

If you: Apr 11, Wayne Barrett rated it really liked it Shelves: After all, trying to understand quantum physics is something my brain just isn't wired to do. I love science, and even though volumes like this can be a task to get through, I am always left enlightened and amazed at the facts and philosophies of existence and all that it encompasses.

The Fabric of the Cosmos: Space, Time, and the Texture of Reality

This is not a book I would recommend if you are only wanting to be entertained, but I will say this; several times during this read I snapped out a stupor and realized I had been staring off into space, lost in those thoughts of time, space, and reality. Dec 26, Mike rated it really liked it. This is a great book that does an excellent job of explaining some of the toughest ideas in modern physics.

My only criticism is that Greene can't figure out who his audience is: Most of the esoteric stuff is banished to the footnotes, which are well worth reading--and I suppose I should be happy that it's there at all, since most books on modern science are written with Hawking's Editor's Law in mind: Dec 24, Tony rated it really liked it Shelves: Brian Greene.

I admit that I skimmed over those parts that I was familiar with, and also skimmed over those parts that were beyond my understanding. Greene attempts to present the current burning questions in his field using simplistic examples drawn from our daily lives. It turns out, however, that the items in question are not so simple. There was a program developed and presented as a Nova episode that I was able to check out from the library.

It will be next up on my agenda. Feb 17, Josh Friedlander rated it really liked it Shelves: Periodically I get inspired to read big science books aimed at clarifying things to laypeople without any maths.

Generally, each time I get slightly further than I did the previous time before eventually losing focus and coasting to the end.

This was one of those times. Greene is a competent writer though ugh, his cheesy TV analogies were not needed , and Smart Science Guy straight out of Central Casting - a graduate of Harvard and Oxford, a happily married vegetarian and accomplished pianist. Less of a character than Feynman with his bongo drums and strip club visits. Some notes I took: The book starts off with the idea of relativity. We generally associate it with Einstein but it goes back to Newton.

Newton said "I won't define space and time since their meaning is known to everyone". As he has it, constant motion is indistinguishable from stationarity, unless you can see So if you're in total darkness can't tell if you're moving.

You cam feel it. It's an interesting question, and a very important one, as we'll see later. One suggestion is that it's just "space' - that's what Newton assumed.

But that's kind of weird. It's like an alphabet with no letters, is that still a thing? Surely it only has meaning because of what it contains? Leibniz suggested that space couldn't exist because then God would have to choose a point within it to put the universe, which would be arbitrary, and everything God does has a reason.

Sounds very theological but in a scientific way we can pose the same question. So is there is no such thing as space? Another possibility was posited by Mach, and it rocked the world of physics. That everything has motion relative to the amount of matter in the universe. If there was almost nothing, motion would be very slight. Until the current amount of mass, and current laws of motion. Lenin wrote a philosophical essay about this while in exile.

The Fabric of the Cosmos ISBN PDF epub | Brian Greene ebook | eBookMall

If so maybe there is no way to tell if you're moving, except relative to other objects! Also, light is just electromagnetic radiation! Speed of light was constant, same as speed of this force propagating in a field.

But what does light move through?

They assumed all forces move within something, so called it the ether after the Aristotelian term an antecedent of modern ethernet cables also! The problem is that light should then have different speed depending on if you're moving towards or away from it.

They had some weird theories about it but none of them held up. Einstein came along and suggested an amazing idea.

Download the cosmos fabric of epub

If light moves at constant speed, time must be relative when you speed up, and movement through space and time must also be connected!! Just like if you are moving north and then turn slightly northwestward your west movement takes away from your northward, so too starting to move through apace say starting from stationary to moving takes away from your movement through time.

Just need to calculate 4-dimensional geometry, weird, but not very difficult maths. Thus clocks moving at different speeds keep different times, and atomic clocks taken on a jet measured vs clocks on the ground have proved this even on earth.

And so you can never approach the speed of light. Therefore it is always constant. Also shows how simultaneity doesn't necessarily exist. It's relative between people. But ultimately space, and time are relative, but spacetime is absolute, just like Newton thought space was.

That's special relativity - constant motion. What about acceleration? Also what about gravity? This was the big flaw for Einstein, since it seems to move faster than light.

How does it work? He thought about it a lot and this led to general relativity. In fact even Newton said he didn't get how it worked. Einstein explained gravity as distortions in spacetime. So the presence of a massive body propagates a wave through spacetime that attracts other bodies. This moves at the speed of light, not instantly! And connected this with the puzzle of acceleration.

Einstein said that acceleration is relative to spacetime, and that only someone weightless can be said to be not accelerating. If you're feeling that pull, you're accelerating relative to spacetime.

Epub download of the cosmos fabric

In other words, the pull of gravity is equivalent to the pull of acceleration. The only person who doesn't feel it is someone in freefall. Einstein is broadly Machian, in that acceleration is relative to something, but for him it's not relative to other matter - it's to spacetime itself. Einstein originally cited Mach as a key influence but eventually rejected his idea.

Quantum Mechanics Light tends to act like a wave. But unlike water, which has waves made out of particles, the actual particles themselves individually behave in a wavelike way. What kind of wave could this be? The answer turned out to be crazy: The electron's location, or photon or any other particle, is a function of probabilities.

Very high around some areas, but non-zero even on the other end of the universe. Thus world changes from deterministic to probabilistic. Einstein with Podolski and Rosen wrote a paper trying to prove that particles do really have positions, before people observe them, thus quantum mechanics doesn't explain the true state of things.

But there's an idea with looking at which direction the particle is spinning along one of three axes, with 2 different detectors - if deterministic, should agree more than half of the time?

Not exactly sure. Results prove EPR to be wrong. Part 2 - Time Talks about if time is something we can move about in, like a river frozen. People very far away would see in their "now" events that happened in the ancient past, but wouldn't be able to affect them.

Can time's arrow move backwards? Entropy tends to increase.

Download Entanglement: The Greatest Mystery in Physics book pdf | audio id:zo0s0o7

Egg breaking but not unbreaking. This is the 2nd law of thermodynamics. Although all physical laws seem symmetrical around time direction, entropy goes only one way. But this is only probability. Where does any order low entropy come from? Since gravity pulls it into clusters. Thus we know time's arrow goes forward because most likely we went from one-off low entropy event Big Bang under gravity to high, than the other way around. Even when order exists it comes at the expense of more order - entropy is always in the black.

If electron goes from A to B, it has probability waves going over every possible path between them. This is what Feynman calls the sum of histories approach.

True of a baseball too - takes every possible path, but with bigger objects the possibilities are so small that classical physics works. If we observe a particle it becomes a particle, if not it's a wave. How does human observation change this? This is a huge, crazy question, and we're not sure of the answer to it, no clear consensus.

Wheeler has an experiment where you have detectors along the way, and so the photon "decides" in the past to be a particle not a wave, when there is future human observation!! Discusses different theories, including multiverse, and how they could answer the arrow of time issue. Cosmology Hubble noticed in California in that galaxies were all rushing away. Was earth the centre of ancient explosion?

Answer was no, and based on relativity. Universe was expanding, so all galaxies would appear to be riding away from each other at equal speed, like pennies drawn on an expanding balloon. And because space expansion is uniform speed, they are all basically stationary relative to space, which is why clocks agree - hence we have one age for the universe, not many.

But we're not being pulled apart because of stronger nuclear forces holding us together. Symmetry one of the most important concepts in cosmology, modern physics in general. Discusses possible shapes of the universe - sphere, infinite cube, torus like video game screen - exit on one side and reappear on the other.

Inflationary universe - dark matter - gravitational waves - Higgs ocean, where we're all surrounded by Higgs particles dragging against us. String theory - many dimensions - gets progressively weirder. Last section is speculation about the future, time travel and teleportation, etc. I tend to be a grouchy skeptic about these things. The time travel paradox is very old hat, and doesn't add much to the plot of Back to the Future. Did you seriously read all this?

This is overall a pretty great book. It really does not contain any maths although I often feel like having some would be better, because at some stage so much becomes "for mathematical reasons beyond our scope, the dimensional frogs must be in the shape of a donut". Greene genuinely loves explaining science and gives you a sense of what's gone on in the field in the last odd years. Even if you don't retain all that much of it, this book will reward your time invested handsomely.

I wish I could say 'The Fabric of the Cosmos' is an easy read which makes clear a subject that only geniuses understand normally about what classic physics and quantum mechanics have to do with understanding the mysteries of cosmology, particularly the theories regarding what the universe is, how it began, what made it function the way it does and why there seems to be an arrow of Time.

I can't. Physics is too hard for me.

However, Brian Greene is a brilliant man with a teacher's magic talent of I wish I could say 'The Fabric of the Cosmos' is an easy read which makes clear a subject that only geniuses understand normally about what classic physics and quantum mechanics have to do with understanding the mysteries of cosmology, particularly the theories regarding what the universe is, how it began, what made it function the way it does and why there seems to be an arrow of Time.

However, Brian Greene is a brilliant man with a teacher's magic talent of sussing out how to simplify and explain difficult complexities of scientific thought. His book 'The Fabric of the Cosmos' did not lose me until the final six chapters! Gentle reader, I highly recommend this book. Physics is not only about observations and experiments, it is mostly about interpreting horribly complicated maths.

Fortunately, Brian Greene leaves the math for the 'Notes' section in the back of this book while describing through analogies and simple-as-possible, and logical, well-written historical vignettes about the key physics discoveries by famous physicists which illuminate the nature of space and time. Each step of increasing scientific knowledge important to cosmology is described in a logical procession of conclusions, facts and theories, chapter by chapter.

I finally understood many much briefer and out-of-context explanations in science articles which I have occasionally read. However, I think I will not remember much of this enlightenment in a few weeks, alas. The newest theories and guesses, described in chapters , about three-branes and brane splats, extra dimensions, string theory holograms, super-symmetry particle spinning, potential energy bowls, free will yes, I said free will , five-string theories, two 'Big Bang' theories, and loop quantum gravity, by these genius scientists are the hardest of all to understand by this ordinary mortal, gentle reader, but perseverance with 'The Fabric of the Cosmos' DID make a small collapse of probabilities in the jittering mass of my excited brain particles so that this cat was radiant with more intelligence upon exiting the ebook.

Unfortunately, though, I have a feeling this enlightenment is but a moon's dim reflective glow, gone as soon as the sun rises. Dec 12, David rated it liked it. This is a nice overview of modern physics, including implications of relativity specific and general , quantum mechanics and string theory, together with a discussion of the implications for cosmology. My own objection to this book is that most of this material has been written elsewhere -- for starters, Greene's earlier book "The Elegant Universe" was an excellent introduction to string theory and its implications.

That's a problem with writing a great book -- it's hard to match the same level of excitement in the next book. The other criticism that one might raise is that string theory and the multiverse, in particular, remain highly controversial in the field. Indeed, some scientists such as Lee Smolin are saying out loud that string theory has been given too much rope for too long, and it is time to face the reality that it has not produced any crisp, testable hypotheses nor is it likely to for a while.

For the same reasons, many are opposed to the notion of the "multiverse", not just for technical reasons but also for philosophical reasons -- how can the hypothesis of an infinity of companion universes, whose existence can only be indirectly suggested, even in principle, qualify as empirical science?

View all 3 comments. Jan 12, Larry Webber rated it really liked it. I finally finished Brian Greene's Fabric of the Cosmos and I am more confused than ever about string theory, M-theory and the nature of spacetime. I feel as though I should read the book again. I guess at least now I am familiar enough with the concepts which confuse me to be able to sound like I know something about general relativity, quantum mechanics and string theory over beers with friends, and that's the important thing, right?

Greene uses lots of pop cultural referenced examples to illustr I finally finished Brian Greene's Fabric of the Cosmos and I am more confused than ever about string theory, M-theory and the nature of spacetime. Mar 13, Melinda rated it really liked it Shelves: Well I finished this book. That aside I thought this was a beautifully written book.

Well researched, interesting and well written. I think I learnt some things Lots of really interesting things in this book. I didn't realize physics had progressed so far in finding a unification theory.

What I found most interesting would probably horrify the author because, while he didn't say so in so many words, he apparently really believes that physics is, or can be, the answer to everything. I, on the other hand, believe there is a God, the Christian God, who has a hand in our existence. I have always thought it curious that descriptions of God or angels appearing Lots of really interesting things in this book. I have always thought it curious that descriptions of God or angels appearing to people seem to be accompanied by bright light and that the supernatural being just appears out of nowhere.

Upon reflection this seemed to me very much like them coming out of another dimension. So, what to my surprise, some of the current notions coming out of physics is that reality consists of more dimensions than we currently are able to experience.

Score one for angels appearing out of nowhere because they can move from another dimension into our 3-dimensional existence. Then there's the issue of God being omniscient, i. OK, He's God, so I suppose he can know all that, but it seems kind of difficult to figure how He can know the future when it hasn't happened yet. So, what to my surprise again, I learn that physics suggests that space and time are not independent but should be considered spacetime.

And from page "that moments--the events making up the spacetime loaf--just are. They are timeless. Each moment--each event or happening--exists, just as each point in space exists. Now what about free will or agency? Christians believe that people can choose to do good or do evil and are therefore responsible for the consequences. On the other hand from page , "The laws of classical physics are deterministic. The equations are indifferent to the supposed freedom of human will.

But then along comes quantum theory and one view is from page , " We might one day find, as some physicists has speculated, that the act of conscious observation is an integral element of quantum mechanics, being the catalyst that coaxes one outcome from the quantum haze to be realized. Those who have faith that God exists don't, or shouldn't, need science to back Him up.

But I've got to admit that it is nice when it does. Of course, as Greene points out, much of what physics proposes is theory that has not been experimentally verified. Some of the above may be supplanted in the future by other theories, but for the time being it is interesting that science seems to verify some of the attributes of God as understood by Christians.

Sep 24, Derek Davis rated it it was amazing. Once again, as in "The Elegant Universe," Greene has done an exemplary job of presenting a "popular" explication of deep science particle physics and cosmology that is neither condescending nor watered down.

I've been amazed both times than anyone could pull this off, since it's been attempted so often but left the subjects either impenetrable or eviscerated. Greene's salient attribute is clarity: He can find and present the basic contours of just about any scientific discipline in clear, disci Once again, as in "The Elegant Universe," Greene has done an exemplary job of presenting a "popular" explication of deep science particle physics and cosmology that is neither condescending nor watered down.

He can find and present the basic contours of just about any scientific discipline in clear, disciplined, open outline. He employs several simple, elementary approaches to make this happen. Beautiful writing with little waste. His use of analogy to elucidate arcane concepts is spot on even when especially when the comparison seems initially off the wall. I can't, in any way, overestimate the worth of this ability. Bertrand Russell made a hash of explaining relativity with a raft of confounding, muddying analogies.

Greene presents an idea and its details from several different but complementary directions that both reinforce the underlying principles and keep them continually in mind. And he doesn't assume that once he's outlined a concept, you will automatically recall its ramifications three days later.

Instead, when he refers to it again, he summarizes it quickly, as if reminding a friend walking with him down a forest path. Greene has his biases mostly in favor of string theory and its near relatives , which he never denies.

The Greatest Mystery in Physics epub download Physics ; General Physics ; November 27, ; How the SuperNEMO experiment could help solve the mystery of the origin of matter in the universe November 27, by Justin Evans, The Conversation " The Fabric of the Cosmos ," a four-hour series based on the book by renowned physicist and author Brian Greene, takes us to the frontiers of physics to see how scientists are piecing together the most complete … Introduction: Welcome to our physics learning page.

We are very excited about our physics page as we believe it will remove some of the " mystery of physics " and make it much easier to learn. Einstein's theory of relativity and the theory of quantum mechanics are two important pillars of modern physics. On the way of achieving a "Theory of Everything," these two theories have to be unified. The Greatest Mystery in Physics txt download For nearly a century, scientists have struggled with the phenomenon of quantum entanglement , which appears to break the classical laws of physics.

The Greatest Mystery in Physics book pdf audio id: Copyright All rights reserved. Developed by LF Studio.